Whitewashing / Limewashing

Whitewashing has been used for many years to cover and protect historic masonry, even before it was historic! A whitewashing application involves mixing lime putty with water in a ratio of 1:5 then vigorously stirring the material until the lime putty fully dissolves in the water. Colors can be added from earth pigments but most material was used white – thus the name. The lime (calcium hydroxide) sets slowly by absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. The chemical reaction that occurs produces crystals of calcite. These crystals are unusual because they have a double reflective index: light entering each crystal is reflected back in duplicate. This results in a wonderful surface glow that is characteristic of whitewashed surfaces and is not found in modern paint products or imitation coatings.

The application of whitewash acts more like an absorptive stain. It is not a coating so it will not peel-off. After it hardens whitewash remains vapor permeable and will not trap moisture in the wall. One of the attractive attributes is that it gradually wears off the surface of the wall over time leaving a very pleasant uneven aged look.

Many architects and designers seek this look but have had challenges because they have been using the wrong products, such as paint, to achieve the effect. If it is a traditional look you want to specify than its best to go back with the traditional material that will get you there.

The key; however, is in thinly applied coats. This facilitates the carbonation process of curing and prevents crazing and cracking. It is helpful to specify onsite application training – as most painting contractors will treat the product like paint and attempt to get the surfaces coated in paint-thickness applications. Most raw masonry surfaces require 3 to 5 applications of whitewash, then after that, just a single coat will do the trick to freshen things up later.

Additional reading: http://www.slideshare.net/speweikpreservation/speweik-limewash-returns-2000

http://ncptt.nps.gov/2011/study-on-the-durability-of-traditional-and-modified-limewash/

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  1. #1 by sportwetten tipps on October 1, 2011 - 12:04 am

    wett tipps
    Thanks for your contribution and I will use it for my school research that I am doing for this website.

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