Historic Portland Cement

Roadside Marker in Lehigh Valley, PA

It was David O. Saylor back in 1871 that produced the first portland cement in the United States in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania.  Between 1871 and 1920, American portland cement production skyrocketed, due in part to the increasing demand for automobiles and the attendant need for roadways during this period.  The years 1871 to 1920 also saw a major change from “traditional” manufacture of cement to a more technically aware, science-based industry.

As a consequence, it was inevitable that cement products that reflected both traditional and modern scientific production methods were on the market at the same time. Thus, anyone looking to match a historic portland cement mortar from the time period between 1871 and 1920 will benefit from considering the evolution of cement production technology during this period.

As popularity of portland cement grew over the period, so did its compressive strength, from 1800 psi in 1871 to 3000 psi by 1920, an astounding 110 percent increase. An examination of the limestone and clay used to produce portland cement, however, shows that they changed very little after 1871. What, then, had changed? Mainly it was the production process and the ability to fire the raw materials to consistently higher temperature.

The main technological breakthrough came with the invention of the rotary kiln, which was first used commercially in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania in 1889. Initial trials by Ransome and Stoke in England had lacked the necessary financial backing to succeed.  In the end, it was left to Seaman and Hurry in the United States to make the final technical refinements that could produce sufficient temperatures and efficiency to unleash the massive portland cement industry we know today.

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